Jajam2018-10-08T16:17:52+00:00
JAJAM

JAJAM

the

people’s textile

the

people’s textile

Folk song

I’ve brought you an ornament, my beloved,
won’t you say something.

How do I talk my dear,
I have betel leaves in my mouth.

I have betel leaves in my mouth
and garland in my hand.

Prepare, my beloved,
we shall go to the beach.

We will go to the beach, my dear,
we will set up the tent.

We will set up the tent, my dear,
we will spread the jajam.

We will spread the jajam, my dear,
we will play chaupad.

We will play chaupad, my dear,
and enjoy winning and losing.

Folk song

I’ve brought you an ornament, my beloved,
won’t you say something.

How do I talk my dear,
I have betel leaves in my mouth.

I have betel leaves in my mouth
and garland in my hand.

Prepare, my beloved,
we shall go to the beach.

We will go to the beach, my dear,
we will set up the tent.

We will set up the tent, my dear,
we will spread the jajam.

We will spread the jajam, my dear,
we will play chaupad.

We will play chaupad, my dear,
and enjoy winning and losing.

Folk song

Ancient Indian board game
CHAUPAD

CUSTOMISED

Jajam was made to order in large
sizes to accommodate community
gatherings in a village or, for guests
coming to a life ceremony. It was
customized according to the space,
for example, as big as a courtyard
in a temple or a house. This floor
covering could be as large as one’s
imagination.

10m x 15m
the biggest jajam we found in a
community temple

3m x 2m
jajam made for household purposes

CUSTOMISED

Jajam was made to order in large
sizes to accommodate community
gatherings in a village or, for guests
coming to a life ceremony. It was
customized according to the space,
for example, as big as a courtyard
in a temple or a house. This floor
covering textile be as large as one’s
imagination.

10m x 15m
the biggest jajam we found in a
community temple

3m x 2m
jajam made for household purposes

Design

Crafts

Block Printing

Block Carving

Namda

1975

CHANGING TIMES

Urbanisation has slowly chipped away at the social fabric of local community life and, today, the craft of jajam making has lost its patrons and appreciators. Since the mid-20th century demand has slowly diminished, with only a handful of printers retaining the skills, resources and resolve to continue. In an attempt to keep up with changing times, many chhipa printers crossed over to inexpensive chemical dyes.

In recent years, a culture of consumerism and competition has taken over and the sense of community living has dissolved. Societies that once gathered together, making collective decisions and celebrating festivals, have all but disappeared. The art of dyeing and printing has also started to be affected. Deforestation within India’s jungles means it is more and more difficult to source natural ingredients. Traditional dyeing and washing processes are an increasingly rare sight as rivers run dry.

In the Dablana (South East Rajasthan) Jajam exhibited here, the red dye flows into many areas. Printers would frequent Mej river banks for washing and achieving the clarity in their natural dyes, especially while handling large textiles. As the river perished, so did the stories of craft in these printing villages.

2016

Rediscovering Jajam

Details of Jajam artisans coming soon.